VHF Marine Walkie Talkie Installation Tips

Article of the Day………ok so i don’t have an article each day, but when i get a chance I’ll post content I find interesting. Fortunate enough here’s one of those articles that I read and needed to share. Should you enjoy it as much as me, please add one of the special social media likes, you know the one that tells one and all that you enjoyed something, rather than you sat on your arse and watched Television!

Installation of a VHF Marine radio can be a bit difficult especially for the people who are new to the gadget.

However, the process can greatly be mollified by following a simple guide. The task is no harder than installing the car stereo. The main reason as to why most of the marine Walkie Talkies seldom work or do not last long is due to poor installation and maintenance. It is therefore advised to take your time during this process.

The first step includes the decision making. You need to establish the position on the boat where you need you VHF marine radio installed. Most people often prefer the side of the counsel or at the bottom edge in the front panel of the counsel. However, the preferred location, other than the two suggestions, is influenced by a few factors.

You should ensure that the location is suitable with no obstruction which can lead to knee bumping or other accidents or damage exposure. Inner surfaces are the most preferred since they offer better protection and keep it away from potential thieves.
The next step would be the wire connections and routing. The 12 VDC wire from the boat battery is the most preferred for the VHF Marine Radio. The wire used should not be smaller than the 14 gage. A standard wire should also be used to ease the installation process as well as the affordable cost.

Special attention should be paid to the connection method when splicing the power wires. The spliced wires should be sealed to prevent short circuits. It would be even better if adhesive line shrink tubes were used. They offer more protection from short circuits which can lead to electrocution or malfunction.

The location of the antenna is the next step after the VHF Marine radio mounting. This can be situated on the boat. It is recommended to keep the antenna towards the middle half of the boat. This will help keep it safe especially when trolling. It is also advised to keep it as far as possible from the electrical noises such as fish finder transducer cables.

Excessive cutting of the antenna cable will greatly affect the performance of the radio. Try as much as possible not to manipulate it against the guides given.
After the cabling and antenna mounting, the next step is fixing the bracket. This is the part that holds in place the VHF Marine radio. Stop nuts and regular nuts are most recommended. This is because the radio is subject to vibrations created by outboards and rough waters.

The nuts will be able to hold it in place. The power supply connectors can then be plugged on the radio with the antenna connector secured behind it. Fix the radio on the brackets to ensure that it is firmly clasped. Fasten the nuts. With that, the whole installation process is over.
However, the gadget requires constant checks to ensure it is always in good working condition.

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Prosthesis-Controlling App Comes in Handy Smartphone App for controlling Prosthesis limbs Touch.

walkie talkie licenseThis was posted a few days ago and we thought it was interesting

A new bionic hand has been unveiled that can be remote controlled via a smartphone app.

The app’s developer, Touch Bionics, unveiled the groundbreaking application, along with their latest prosthetic hand, in April of this year.

The hand’s artificial thumb is controlled by signals from the users arm muscles, which are interpreted by the hand’s internal systems. However, in a world first, it can also be controlled, very simply, via the use of the new app.

The app features an array of preset positions that can be selected by the user tapping the screen with her/his thumb. When a position is selected, the prosthesis can react instantly, changing to ‘thumbs up’, ‘just a little bit’ or ‘OK’ positions easily. The app is not limited to simple positions, however, and more complicated functions, such as holding objects, handling documents and even typing, are featured as preset options.

In addition to the app, the bionic hand also features improved dexterity due to the presence of new extra-sensitive fingertip electrodes. In addition, the thumb can now move into 24 separate positions, made possible either by the user or the app.

The Bionic Touch app configures the hand positions into playlist-like folders such as ‘work’, which feature all hand positions regularly used at work (typing, using a mouse etc), so that the positions are within easy reach of the user.

The app itself also features training modes designed to help people learn to use it quickly and easily as well as diagnostic features that can interact with the hand itself and troubleshoot any possible problems.

The app has already received a measure of positive feedback from users, Bertolt Meyer, who uses the new hand, was quoted by ‘New Scientist’ as saying, “Powered thumb rotation, combined with the mobile app and quick access to all these new grips, gives me natural hand function that I never imagined would be possible,”

Learning to use a prosthetic limb is an extremely painful and frustrating process, but this app may just make the process a tiny bit easier for those who use it.